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The Very Hungry Caterpillar: toeprints

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As well as our handprint caterpillars today, we made toe print ones!!! We painted our toes green, forgetting at first that the Very Hungry Caterpillar has a red head (hence why some are red!). This was fun because the paint was cold and slimy on toes, and tickled!!

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Then we printed lots of them onto a sheet of white paper.

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When they were dry we cut ten of them out and stuck them down to make a page of ten very hungry caterpillars!

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The Very Hungry Caterpillar: handprints

I love handprints! You can make just about anything out of a handprint or footprint, it makes a lovely memento and is an excellent tactile and sensory thing to do. When Harrison was little he really hated getting his hands dirty and touch anything messy but now loves painting his hands! When we were decorating our living room before Christmas we gave him a little paintbrush and some paint to ‘help’. He immediately painted his hands and proceeded to help decorate with handprints! Alex has always loved having his hands painted, obviously not as sensitive!

To carry on with our Very Hungry Caterpillar theme, we made caterpillar handprints. I saw this idea on Pinterest somewhere so can’t take credit for the idea!

All you need is blue, green and red paint, white paper and a black pen 

I painted the palms of their hands green and their fingers blue

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and then repeatedly printed them in a row on the paper. We did three or four prints. When we had done this (and washed the paint off!), we painted a bright red head for the caterpillar and left the pictures to dry. Once they had dried we drew on antenna and eyes and mouth with black pen.

What do you think?

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Circle printing

In the summer, we started working on shape and colour with Harrison. As we were lucky enough to have had such nice weather (for once!) we did most of our art and crafts outside.

We decided to start with circles, as it is the easiest shape to draw, its difficult to confuse with other shapes (rectangles & squares) and a circle forms a base for many letters.

We started off by going on a circle hunt. We went round the playroom and the kitchen finding as many things as possible that were circular.

We found:
Cookie and play dough cutters
Lids to jars (all different sizes)
Bowls
Cups
The little measuring thing you use for washing machines
Tubs
Building blocks

It’s amazing what you find when you’re looking! We then chose a colour. At this point Harrison knee that red and blue were colour words but I don’t think he could actually identify the colour, son we chose red. We put some paint on a plastic plate and then got to work dipping the circles into the paint and then printing it into the paper. I kept repeating the vocabulary – ‘ that’s a nice red circle’, ‘can you print me a big red circle?’ etc, and we counted all the circles. We noticed that some were big and some were small, and that the cookie cutters made a wobbly edge!

The great thing about this activity is that you could choose different shapes and colours to focus on.

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Painting with feet

I definitely recommend doing this on a warm dry day and in the garden unless you’re very brave daft, as it does get rather messy!!

Harrison had great fun doing this. I ripped off some paper from a roll of lining paper (£2 from Wilko, great for loads of art activities!) and weighed it down with some large stones. On plastic plates I squirted some red and blue paint (the washable stuff used in schools). Then we took our shoes off, put our feet in the cold slimy paint and walked and stamped and marched all over the paper. It was so much fun!

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I made sure I was prepared before hand and had a washing up bowl of warm soapy water and a towel ready to wash feet when we’d finished. Still ended up with colourful footprints on the yard!

We will definitely be doing this again in the summer (weather permitting!) but will change it a bit by putting blobs of different coloured paint on the paper first rather than on plates, and now Harrison is less fussy about paint on his hands we will use hands and feet.

Because we had such a big piece of paper we didn’t keep the whole piece of paper, I just cut an a4 size bit off for their art folder but I would fold it up and keep it next time and use as lovely personalised wrapping paper – could plan ahead and use festive colours for christmas paper!

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One of the mum, Kayleigh, in the Activities 4 kids Facebook group (please feel to send a request to join!)  also did this activitiy with her daughter – as you can see messy but fun!!

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Melted snowman

Today we made some melted snowman, inspired by this post by Kiwi Crate.
Such a simple, abstract activity that is perfect for toddlers as there is no right or wrong way to do it. We just used our sponge paintbrushes (which we get from The Works to splodge white paint onto blue paper. Once it was dry, Harrison glued on googly eyes, punched out circles of black paper for buttons, a cut out hat and scarf and an orange nose. He could put these wherever he wanted! It was a great opportunity for some early science – we talked about the snowman melting when he gets warm.

What do you think?

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